Empire.

You know what Fifty don’t got, Taraji P. Henson. And she’s worth more than a dollar.

Spice is an aromatic or pungent substance used to add flavor. Taraji is a spice. I don’t know what to call the spice. I know that it’s black and goes good with everything. Empire is a tale of a modern family, minus the suburbs a la musical drug kingdoms.

Or was it a queendom?

Cookie (Henson) and Lucious, played by Terrence Howard has three sons; who all will seek claim to their families musical dynasty. Each son has his own unique talent and/or business acumen as well as estranged relationship with their parents.

I haven’t watched a pilot episode in a long time that was this engaging. In less than 30 minutes, I was persuaded into watching episode two. Most times it takes three episodes, to hook me.

It has the finesse and trimmings of black culture, but not completely as we expect. It has themes fit for Shakespeare and new age drama with material that will become viewer’s guilty, juicy obsession. I can see critics already speaking on lack of originality and how Hip Hop doesn’t sell—better known as there’s no market for blackness. But they’ll watch it.

Fox’s “Empire” is co-created by Lee Daniels (“Precious” and “The Butler”) and Danny Strong (“The Butler” and “Hunger Games: Mockingjay”). Malik Yoba is back on the small screen. Timbaland is the shows songwriter and song producer. The cast has its share of up and coming actors such as Trai Bryers, Bryshere Gray and Jussie Smollett.

Brilliantly, we get to pick sides. Do you want Cookie to prevail or Lucious?

My money is on Taraji.

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“Twisted” by 50 Cent featuring Mr. Probz

“Big Rich Town” by 50 Cent featuring Joe

Wanksta.

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Omari Hardwick got a new gig.

Power. He got the money, now he wants the respect. Was that corny? I can’t help it. Certain words triggers my mental radio and blast vintage rap lyrics.

A white man and a black man got the juice; the best of both worlds type of thing. But the black guy wants out: retirement, 401K, white sand on beaches. The white boy worships the shit like heaven.

I’m intrigued but not wholly persuaded.

I’ve watched every season of “Boardwalk Empire.” My television and I have had deep conversations on perfect revenge plots. No doubt, I have issues with the UNIA discrepancies as Jeffrey Wright joined the cast as Valentin Narcisse. It’s critically acclaimed. Each actor is effortlessly committed.

Hell, even after watching “The Wire,” certain drama just ain’t gangsta. Maybe the key is Michael K. Williams, our very own Chalky White and Omar Little.

The show is very “The Coldest Winter Ever” meets “True to the Game” a la watered down Studio 54. In no way am I comparing Sister Souljah to Teri Woods or diminishing the infinite influence of 54 on NY’s night life.

But I’m not in high school. So, I can bet on who’s going to die and which chick (possibly Mrs. Patrick played by Naturi Naughton) is going to place a flashy fur coat on an otherwise inconspicuous drug dealer and have him gone for a couple of Novembers.

What I do like, which is odd, is Curtis Jackson. 50 Cent not only executive produced the joint but also has a role to play. The theme music is crack. It comes in like ice cream, yes ice cream. Joe’s voice is so smooth on “Big Rich Town,” that you recall exactly why he ruled the ’90s. As you bob your head in acceptance, you realize Joe needs to drop a new hit. Usher can’t do it all!

What I truly love about “Power” is that it’s bilingual. As a displaced African, I am enamored with language. Its texture, the complexities and how familial it is to those that are so privileged to speak it.

Many ignorantly suggest that language is not imperative to freedom but I strongly infer differently. “Gang Related” also has the precious presence of two languages, three if you include the bits of Russian and Korean. “Power” shares a cast member with “Related,” Lela Loren.

Lastly, maybe I’ve had enough infidelity from the tube that I cringed as I watched “I Gotta Go.” Just know my lip turned up at the dinner table scene and later when Ghost romantically recalls a nostalgic melody. The fifth episode ends with 50 Cent’s tune, “Twisted.”

Omari is adequate eye candy. However, what made “Luther” worth my time other than Idris Elba is that the show was insanely unpredictable and poignantly written.

Watch if you must. I have thus far.

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