Mississippi Mud²

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What if it’s not so much about sex, but it’s more about how we treat each other so that we can express ourselves freely, sexually. I write this as I ironically watch the “no ifs, ands, or butts” episode from “Sex and the City.” I enjoyed the progression of the show but I am not ignorant to the fact that the show did not showcase sexual freedom that looked black. Unless, you count the brief relationship Miranda had with Blair Underwood or that one time Samantha had relations with a black guy, who was referred to as a “big black pussy” during Carrie’s narration. The lunch conversation about black talk, being politically correct and affirmative action was awkward. It was the show’s way, off at best at including us. I’m a person, it’s really that simple. Interestingly enough, when Chivon’s sister, Adeena, expressed her displeasure with their intermingling she told Samantha that she’d send over some Mississippi Mud pie.

So, how do you interview the creator of Mississippi Mud and recapture the raw, intrigue for a second time, for those that were going to attend the event and others that weren’t interested either way; yet valued the conversation of the Q&A? Add liquor.

Hello everybody! We are attempting this interview, a little different this time, with the help of influence…a number of influences.

We fucked up! I’m dizzaayy!

Q: How do you put on a show like this without crossing the thin line of objectivity?

A: I look at this show as a complete art piece and as an artist I express myself. I have an image that I want to portray but I don’t be thinking like damn am I objectifying my muse or am I objectifying myself. I just feel that it’s my duty to express myself. I don’t really think about the word objectivity. It doesn’t come into my frame of mind when I creating a body of work.

Q: How do you love black women/men or their bodies without objectifying them?

A: It’s hard. Shit! We is the shit. That’s an object the shit. And we is it, whatever it is, we is it definitely. There is nothing like making love with that black energy. There’s nothing like it. You know so it’s hard. I don’t if I’ve mastered that myself. You know I be like this some good pussy, object. That’s a phat ass, object. Nice titties, object. Wheeww she got a nice complexion, object. You know, I just love us. I love everything about us mentally, physically and spiritually—temporal to metaphysical.

Q: How do you define objectivity?

A: Objectivity is. That’s deep! Objectivity means to take advantage of a thing for your own gain and satisfaction.

Q: Have we managed, as black people, to fetishize ourselves in the same ways our ancestor’s captors did?

A: Definitely, when we go on porn sites we go for the black stuff, every now and again we dabble off into that but for the most part we for the ebony section or the black woman section. We have categorized ourselves in our minds and we have accepted the categorization.

Q: What was the best thing(s) about the first Mississippi Mud?

A: The energy. The energy was so fucking dope. It was a whole bunch of sexy, black people. People were in love, some people trying to get in lust. It was just a bunch of good vibes, under one roof, one energy, one vibration, one frequency.

Q: What did you learn?

A: I learned that we have to be careful with sex. It is not to be taking lightly and we need to have more of it. People need to have more sex. More holistic sex, holistic in the sense that satisfaction isn’t one sided. More guys are being satisfied and women are not being satisfied. And we don’t know how to make love to each other.

Q: Why June 18th?

A: June 18th is the day before Juneteenth. One this day we celebrate our freedom and what better way to celebrate your freedom than getting physically naked and take freedom of your naked self. And do what you want to do, at least for a couple of hours…just feel free, unadulterated, no supervision. Just free. No cell phones. No worries.

Q: What do you say to people that believe black sexual/love expression is a tiny problem compared to other issues we have?

A: This is a big problem because the first chakra is the root chakra. And at the base, we need to learn how to love ourselves physically. We have to learn how to love ourselves physically so that other people can love us. Ain’t nobody gonna love you more than you love yourself. You have to take pride in loving yourself. Self-love, sex, and masturbation and all that shit. You know it’s big, black sex is big. No pun intended.

Q: A person could just log onto any of the millions of porn sites, visit heavily black populated cities or Africa why is Mississippi Mud still important after already having one?

A: Mississippi Mud is important because I want it to be a spiritual experience that we have annually to remind us to take pride in closeness, in our love. I feel like heterosexuality and homosexuality are under attack and the base of it, it’s really love. And what better way to celebrate than together with some people, some art, some good food, and party. Hopefully, go home and make some love or find a dark corner and make some love. We scared to make love. We scared to dance with each other now. We go on one side of the room, the other person goes on the other side of the room. And we wait for someone to say something to us or we stare at our phones on Instagram; while we’re at the club. I’m drunk.

Q: There was a certain energy at Mississippi Mud, the naysayers couldn’t feel it but it was there. What do you think or know contributed to the energy?

A: The spirits in the room. We are spirits having a human experience and the spirits were in the room and the contributed heavily to the texture of the feeling that we all were receiving. It was necessary.

Q: I’m trying to catch up with you.

A: How I am trying to catch up with you, I’m Juicy! You’re the one trying to be Gaddafi on the liquor.

Q: I said I’m trying to catch up with you.

A: Is this on the record or off the record?

Q: Everything is on the record.

A: Whose idea was this? Do you do all of your interviews like this, young lady? [Insert laughter]

Q: So, why do you think there were people that could not feel it?

A: It wasn’t for everybody. It’s not for everybody. Everything ain’t for everybody and I feel like people were there with arms folded on the defense. So if you don’t allow something to come in or invite something to come in; it’s going to have to break itself in. So you lock your doors and padlock all the windows, you’re not going to get the feeling. It’s like the Holy Ghost. I’m sorry church.

Q: But the locked doors and windows can’t save you, though?

A: It can’t because it’s going to overcome you. It’s going to overcome you, whether it’s the pheromones, the abundance of flesh, the abundance of smiles and laughter, or genuine vibes it’s going to overtake you or you gone have to get the fuck on. Get your shit and leave. Answer that text message you got, in the car because there is a no cell phone policy. [Insert laughter] I’m drunk.

Q: Why do you think people and stood on the sidelines with that type of energy?

A: They’re voyeurs. They’re voyeurs. Voyeurs like to watch. They like to pretend to be prudish. That’s their thing, that’s their fetish; to watch and pretend. I don’t like this. Some of us like to watch, it’s okay lurkers. You can watch, we not going to stop giving you things to watch. This is three types of whiskey. The Karamoko Way gets you drunk.

Q: Why be so open about sex?

A: It’s already open. It’s all over the radio. It’s all over the television. I think people are just bent out of shape because it’s black sex. Black sex is offensive and I keep reiterating that. Now, if this was white people getting naked riding their bikes through the city, nobody would give a shit. But when black people get on our bikes and ride butt naked through the city, oh we’re breaking some type of law. It’s going to be some city ordinance saying that if your dick is over three inches then you can’t ride your bike. And if it ain’t one, they’ll make one by the morning and they’re going to have your ass locked up. White people get to do what they want to do. Black people, we got to just let our wang out! I’m drunk as fuck.

Q: So is Mississippi Mud the equivalent of that, does it give black people the opp…

A: Black people don’t need an opportunity. We do this shit on the regular. I’m providing us with the atmosphere. I’m providing us with the atmosphere to feel comfortable, in our own skin. But just once in a while can we be comfortable to black. Sometimes it’s just uncomfortable to be black. Have you ever been in a room full of people of different races? You can just feel the tension. For one second, I just don’t want us to feel no tension about nothing—our weight, size, age, look, nothing. Just be free. Just be Africa, for one minute. Just be Mississippi, for one minute. Feel your heritage and your culture, just for one minute.

A: Other than not contributing to rape culture, what’s the universal benefit of talking about sex, in real ways?

A: Education, we lack sexual education in the black community and that has been our downfall. We don’t talk about it openly, in our churches, in our schools, our recreational facilities or after school programs and our homes. We don’t talk about black sexuality. And it’s not just straight; it’s not just homosexual—black sex is not just one way. Black sexuality like I said, it’s big. It’s very big and it’s very diverse. It’s been diverse since the beginning of time, from my studies. Whether we want to acknowledge or not it’s going to be here. We need to start talking about it openly. It’s a big thing in our community. Intrinsically, in our DNA and ingrained fertility is. That’s the dilemma that we’re in right now, how do we procreate and not just create? How does everyone find the love mate or partner in even situations and circumstances? What the fuck, these questions are deep?

Q: Sexuality is fluid, should there be boundaries?

A: I feel like whatever you want to do within the boundaries of mainstream should be followed. That’s what I believe because laws change on the needs of the people and governance change on the needs of the people. Who knows why God chose a fifteen-year-old teenager to get pregnant with the son of God but it happened. Who knows why my mother was pregnant at 15 with me, but it happened and when you think about sexuality and children it’s not supposed to happen but God’s truth is; it’s happening.

Q: Do you think, sexuality is what it is, it’s fluid, there are no real boundaries but that humans have devolved?

A: Hell yeah humans have devolved. If humans had evolved my phone wouldn’t be smarter than me. It wouldn’t be a smart phone; it would be a dumb phone. I think that we have definitely devolved. We’ve devolved so much we can’t reproduce things that we’ve done in the past like the pyramids or civilization. We’re not civilized right now. We’re not a civilized society.

Q: Do you think we’re uncivilized because we measure evolution based on what we can make and not we can do?

A: I definitely think the problem is technology. Technology is out evolving humanity and we’re losing our humanity in our technology. We don’t know how to be close to each other anymore. We don’t have to socialize with each other anymore in the physical sense. We’re losing the touch; we’re losing the importance of flesh. In a minute, flesh is going to be very expensive.

Q: How?

A: People aren’t going to accept minimum wage jobs. They’re going to want actual money for the flesh to be there. People are going to require more for their time because they’re going to know their worth. I think that we’re waking up. I know that we’re waking up.

Mississippi Mud: Saturday, June 18th, 2016 10pm-4a
Club Reign 2055 Gratiot Detroit, MI    @
 St. Aubin , East of 75

FOR MORE INFORMATION BEN JONES CAN BE CONTACTED THROUGH FACEBOOK MESSENGER (BENJONESDETROIT) or by email: benjamin_jones@live.com

 

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